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Rep. Jeffries has submitted funding requests for important community projects in New York’s 8th Congressional District to the House Appropriations Committee. 

Under guidelines issued by the Appropriations Committee, each Representative may request funding for projects in their community for fiscal year 2023 – although only a handful may actually be funded. Projects are restricted to a limited number of federal funding streams, and only state and local governments and eligible non-profit entities are permitted to receive funding. Additional information on the reforms governing Community Project Funding is available here.

In compliance with House Rules and Committee requirements, Rep. Jeffries has certified that he, his spouse and his immediate family have no financial interest in any of the projects he may request.



Requested Projects

NOTE: The projects are listed in alphabetical order by project name

Project Name: The Alpha School, Brooklyn, NY 11208 (NY08)

  • Proposed Recipient:  Sun River Health
  • Recipient Address: 1037 Main Street, Peekskill, NY 10566
  • Project Location: 2400 Linden Boulevard, Brooklyn, NY 11208 
  • Amount Requested: $1,800,000
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to renovate Sun River Health’s Alpha School outpatient substance use treatment program to accommodate integrated primary care services. Located in the East New York neighborhood of Brooklyn, the proposed service expansion will target residents living in the 8th congressional district. With additional funds, this expansion will allow Sun River Health to reach many more in the community as well as expand primary healthcare services to current substance abuse patients.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Athletic Field for P.S. 298 Dr. Betty Shabazz Junior High School, Brooklyn, NY 11212 (NY08) 

  • Proposed Recipient: NYC Department of Education 
  • Recipient Address:52 Chambers St-rm 320, New York, NY 10007-1222.
  • Project Location: PS 298, Brownsville (85 Watkins St) 
  • Amount Requested: $607,150.40 
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to provide Brownsville public school students with a beautiful, multi-purpose play yard, complete with an athletic field, track and full basketball court. This project will provide equitable access to an outdoor facility that promotes health and wellness within the community. Installing a new multi-use play surface and walking track would provide a sorely needed, safe, outdoor play and exercise area within a community that has historically lacked access to outdoor play space.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Bay View Sustainability Workforce Eco-Hub, Brooklyn, NY 11236 (NY08) 

  • Proposed Recipient: Green City Force 
  • Recipient Address: 630 Flushing Avenue, 8th Fl Suite 817, Brooklyn, NY 11206
  • Project Location: Bay View Houses, Brooklyn, NY 11236 
  • Amount Requested: $750,000 
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to expand and enhance the important work of Green City Force’s Bay View Eco-Hub, a two-acre farm in the middle of the Canarsie housing development where community members are trained to grow and prepare nutritious food while also building their workforce skills. This project will provide stipends and good salaries for local youth and program staff, create 10 – 15 additional jobs and increase the presence of paid local graduates overseeing the composting and other sustainability aspects of the Hub. 
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Brooklyn Thrive, Brooklyn, NY 11212 (NY08) 

  • Proposed Recipient: Elite Learners 
  • Recipient Address: 45 Belmont Ave, Brooklyn, NY 11212
  • Amount Requested: $750,000 
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to promote financial self-sufficiency and reduce poverty by providing financial literacy and wealth management programming for families and public-school students in Brooklyn, New York.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: CAMBA’s Career Navigation Initiative, Brooklyn NY (NY08) 

  • Proposed Recipient: CAMBA, Inc. 
  • Recipient Address: 1720 Church Avenue, 2nd Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11226
  • Project Location: East New York neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY 
  • Amount Requested: $590,000 
  • Explanation of Request: CAMBA’s Career Navigation Initiative (CNI) will be an innovative workforce development hub, piloted in East New York, Brooklyn, where such services do not exist and are sorely needed.  CNI will offer a suite of career navigation opportunities, including success and financial coaching, industry specific training and credentialing, ongoing career navigation support and job placement services, across five CAMBA community centers, equipped with office space for one-on-one sessions and classrooms for group trainings.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Cybersecurity and Science Technology Initiative, Brooklyn, NY 11205 (NY08) 

  • Proposed Recipient: St. Joseph’s College New York  
  • Recipient Address: 245 Clinton Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11205
  • Amount Requested: $754,000
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to create a fully functional cybersecurity lab at SJC Brooklyn and support crucial equipment upgrades for the College’s organic chemistry laboratory.  The project addresses an urgent need for digital fluency and security among our future workforce and in our community. It also makes foundational investments in training high-need cybersecurity professionals and basic scientific research, serves to increase female representation in the cybersecurity/STEM workforce and trains local students for jobs in the innovation economy.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Emergency Food Programming, Brooklyn, NY (NY08)

  • Proposed Recipient: Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty 
  • Recipient Address: 77 Water Street, 26th floor, New York, NY 10005
  • Project Location: Various locations in NY08
  • Amount Requested: $1,000,000
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to procure kosher and halal food items for use at food pantries in New York’s Eighth Congressional District.  Improving access to food in a manner that recognizes and respects these dietary restrictions is a vital component of addressing hunger in America.  The Metropolitan Council on Jewish Poverty’s food distribution efforts are especially important to the many seniors in our community who rely on their nutritional support.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Expanding Access to Dance Education and Training, Brooklyn, NY 11233 (NY09) 

  • Proposed Recipient: Stars of New York Dance, Inc. 
  • Recipient Address: 379 Saratoga Avenue, #3, Brooklyn, NY 11233
  • Amount Requested: $500,000  
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to provide free dance education and training to children and youth from low-income communities in New York City to help students develop discipline, confidence and self-esteem to succeed in both school and life. Dance has long been recognized for having a positive influence on children’s academic attainment and social and emotional development.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Habitat for Humanity’s Project Constellation, Brooklyn, NY (NY08, NY09)

  • Proposed Recipient: Habitat for Humanity New York City and Westchester County
  • Recipient Address: 111 John Street, 23rd Floor, New York, NY 10038
  • Project Location: Eight scattered sites located in the Brooklyn, NY neighborhoods of East New York, Ocean Hill, Brownsville, Bedford-Stuyvesant and Rugby Remsen Village.  
  • Amount Requested: $3,000,000
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to build 71 units of affordable housing in Central Brooklyn.  The project will create positive neighborhood impact by infilling vacant lots and diminishing blight, while acting as an anti-displacement measure in historically redlined and rapidly gentrifying neighborhoods.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Hudson Raritan Estuary (HRE)- Fresh Creek, NY Ecosystem Restoration Project

  • Proposed Recipient: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
  • Recipient Address: N/A 
  • Project Location: E 108th St., Brooklyn, NY 11239
  • Amount Requested: $500,000
  • Explanation of Request: This funding would be used for planning, engineering and design for the Fresh Creek portion of the Hudson Raritan Estuary project. Restoration of Fresh Creek provides the 2nd greatest benefits among all the HRE projects to be restored- providing ecosystem benefits and coastal storm risk management benefits serving as Natural and Nature Based Features (NNBFs) providing a natural buffer from waves, tides, winds and floods helping to reduce coastal shoreline erosion and property damage during storm events. Restoration of wetlands at the Fresh Creek site provide critical habitat that has been lost in the Jamaica Bay ecosystem. The restoration of more than 24 acres of wetlands (a scarce resource compared to historical levels) improves connectivity of currently fragmented vital nursery, nesting and feeding habitat from adjacent marsh islands for hundreds of migratory birds (including the federally-listed threatened piping plover and endangered rosette tern), fish and wildlife (terrapins and four endangered/threatened turtles). The dredging, regrading and capping of the channel at Fresh Creek will improve habitat and the hydrologic function and geomorphic characteristics resulting in improved tidal flushing and circulation, as well as improved water and sediment quality within the Bay. Restoration of Fresh Creek will create a sustainable and resilient shoreline in Brooklyn within the perimeter area of Jamaica Bay. In addition, the restoration of the Fresh Creek will benefit disadvantaged and Potential Environmental Justice Areas (PEJA). Within a one (1) mile radius of this urbanized site, the population is 62,127 and is composed of 93% people of color, 37% are low income and all experience poor air quality (including diesel particulate matter [>95%], air toxic cancer risk [>95%], air toxic respiratory hazard index [>95%]). The Fresh Creek portion of the Hudson Raritan Estuary project is consistent with the President’s Justice Executive Order.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Incarcerated Veterans Transitional Program, Brooklyn, NY 11206 (NY08)

  • Proposed Recipient: Black Veterans for Social Justice, Inc.
  • Recipient Address: 665 Willoughby Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11206
  • Amount Requested: $1,000,000
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to provide employment, housing and other assistance to formerly incarcerated veterans.  The project would meaningfully improve the lives of veterans in our community by helping them secure employment, which reduces recidivism, enhancing public safety and saving taxpayer dollars.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Interfaith Medical Center Emergency Department Modernization, Brooklyn, NY 11213 (NY08)

  • Proposed Recipient: Interfaith Medical Center Campus
  • Recipient Address: 1545 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11213
  • Amount Requested: $7,000,000
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to renovate the emergency department at Interfaith Medical Center Campus, resulting in a modern, improved layout that will enhance patient care and improve both patient satisfaction and safety. This project will preserve and enhance medical care to a mostly Medicare/Medicaid patient population living in Brooklyn communities that are historically medically underserved.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: Meal Distribution and Senior Transportation Initiative, Brooklyn, NY 11235 (NY08) 

  • Proposed Recipient: APNA Brooklyn Community Center, Inc. 
  • Recipient Address: 236 Neptune Avenue, 2nd Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11235
  • Project Location: 225 Neptune Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11235 
  • Amount Requested: $670,902 
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to help provide food to individuals in the South Brooklyn community who are experiencing food insecurity and in need of assistance.  The passenger vans will expand APNA’s ability to deliver food to the homes of seniors and other individuals who are unable to wait in line.  They will also be used to transport seniors and individuals with disabilities, enhancing quality of life and improving access to health and support services.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: NPF Strings Programs, Brooklyn, NY 11216 (NY08) 

  • Proposed Recipient: The Noel Pointer Foundation 
  • Recipient Address: 1368 Fulton Street, Brooklyn NY 11216
  • Amount Requested: $414,500 
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to support Noel Pointer Foundation’s (NPF) Strings programing in New York’s Eighth Congressional District, which includes 6 public schools and 8 daycares, as well as On-Campus Strings programs at NPF’s offices in Bedford Stuyvesant. Approximately 150 students onsite and up to 1500 offsite will enjoy the many benefits of music instruction, including improved cognitive ability, academic achievement and mental health.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.

Project Name: STEM with Hydroponic Farming in the Classroom, Brooklyn, NY (NY08)

  • Proposed Recipient: New York Sun Works, Inc.
  • Recipient Address: 157 Columbus Ave, Suite 432, New York, NY 10023
  • Project Location: 12 Public Schools in NY-08
  • Amount Requested: $500,000
  • Explanation of Request: The funding would be used to build Hydroponic Farm-Classrooms in 12 NY-08 K-12th grade public schools in the neighborhoods hardest hit by COVID-19 and provide a comprehensive curriculum to teach science, sustainability, nutrition and climate education through the lens of urban farming. The program brings quality science and sustainability education to the communities where it is most needed while also offering the social-emotional benefits of growing plants in the classroom and increasing access to fresh, healthy food for food-insecure students and their families.
  • Signed certification letter stating there is no financial interest in the project.



Project Requirements

The following factors are absolute requirements that must be met for approval by the Appropriations Committee:

Eligible Entities – Non-profits, state and local governments, and tribal organizations are generally all eligible recipients. For-profit entities are not eligible.

Funding Year – Each project request must be for fiscal year 2023 funds only and cannot include a request for multiyear funding. The fiscal year runs from October 1, 2022, to September 30, 2023. In limited circumstances, the performance period for a project may extend beyond one year.

Accounts – Only a limited number of budgetary accounts are open for community funding project requests. Each varies in requirements and eligible uses for funds. A complete list of those accounts is listed below and should be referred to in order to find the most appropriate account for the proposed project. In some cases, a project may be eligible under more than one account, and Congressman Jeffries’ staff will work with the organization to determine the most competitive account.

Community Support – Projects must demonstrate engagement and support from the community, which can be shown through, as some examples: letters of support from local elected officials, city councils, stakeholder groups, etc.; press articles highlighting the need; and inclusion on community development plans.

Financial Disclosure – Congressman Jeffries must certify and publicly disclose that he and his immediate family have no financial interest in the requested project.

Online Disclosure – Following review by the House Appropriations Committee, all requested projects will be listed on the Congressman’s website and on the Committee’s website with basic information about the project, the proposed recipient, and amount of the request.

In addition, the House Appropriations Committee has advised certain factors that, while not required, are considerations that may improve a project’s likelihood of approval:

Funding Range – The amount of funding that the Committee will approve varies somewhat from account to account and by type of project, but the majority of successful projects are expected to receive between $250,000 and $1 million.

Catalyst Funding – The ideal project will be one such that an award would be the final funding component to allow the project to move forward. In other words, the community funding would not replace existing available funding sources nor simply continue an existing program.

Financial Sustainability – The ideal project should be able to demonstrate that it can be completed with the award of community funding or be sustainable in the long term. This is to ensure that the contribution of federal taxpayer funds do not go to waste or require additional or continual community funding support to remain viable.

Accounts

The annual appropriations process involves the drafting, passage, and enactment of twelve separate appropriations bills that fund the operations of different parts of the federal government. Community funding projects are available in ten of those bills, in specified accounts. Each Appropriations Subcommittee with jurisdiction over those accounts will determine which projects receive funding and has released guidance on the factors they will use in their evaluations. In addition, the eligibility requirements and the allowed uses for funds will vary from account to account. 

The information below lists the subcommittees and accounts that are open for community funding project requests, as well as some of the primary eligibility requirements. A link is provided to the subcommittees’ guidance documents, which include more detailed information. Where possible, a description of a typical award size is provided, but the actual availability of funds will depend on the number and scope of requests that are submitted within and across all accounts and congressional offices.

Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies

Department of Agriculture, Community Facilities Grants (guidance) – Grant funds can be used to purchase, construct, or improve essential community facilities, to purchase equipment, and pay other related project expenses. Examples of eligible projects include medical or dental clinics, towns halls, courthouses, childcare centers, police or fire departments, public works vehicles, or distance learning equipment. Initial operating expenses or annual recurring expenses are generally not eligible.

Any project must serve a rural area as specified in 7 CFR 3570.53. There is a cost share requirement and applicants must certify they cannot finance the project from their own resources and credit is not otherwise available. For FY22, the average grant in this account was just over $1 million.

Department of Agriculture, ReConnect Program (guidance) – Grants funds can be used for the costs of construction, improvement, or acquisition of facilities and equipment needed to provide broadband service to rural areas without sufficient broadband access. The area must be rural and lack sufficient access to broadband service. Stand-alone middle-mile projects are not eligible, however, middle-mile facilities are eligible if they are needed to bring sufficient broadband service to all premises in the area.

All policies and procedures apply, including environmental and related reviews and the cost share requirement of 25% of the overall project cost. As a point of reference, the average award in this account was nearly $2 million in FY22.

Department of Agriculture, Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grants (guidance) – The Distance Learning and Telemedicine (DLT) program helps rural communities acquire the technology and training necessary to connect educational and medical professionals with students, teachers, and patients in rural areas. Grants may be used for audio and video equipment, broadband facilities that support distance learning or telemedicine (not actual broadband), computer hardware or network components/software, and acquisition of instructional programing.

All requests are subject to the regulations governing the program, which can be found at 7 CFR Part 1734. The program requires a 15% match that cannot come from another federal source. Awards in FY22 typically ranged from $50,000 to $1,000,000.

Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Buildings and Facilities (guidance) – The Agricultural Research Service (ARS) owns and operates laboratories and facilities across the United States. Facility requests must be for ARS-owned facilities or for facilities that will enhance ongoing ARS work. Requests can assist in the acquisition of land, construction, repair, improvement, extension, alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities as necessary to carry out the agricultural research programs of the Department of Agriculture. Grants in FY22 began at $4 million.

Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service, Conservation Operations (guidance) – Conservation Operations has four major program components: Conservation Technical Assistance, Soil Survey, Snow Survey and Water Supply Forecasting, and Plant Materials Centers. Examples of specific objectives include reduce soil erosion, improve soil health, enhance water supplies, improve water quality, increase wildlife habitat, and reduce damage caused by floods and other natural disasters. Urban agriculture programs will not be considered. The average award in FY22 was $1.1 million.

Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies

NIST, Scientific and Technical Research and Services (STRS) (guidance) – Funding must be for activities consistent with and supportive of NIST’s mission and within its authorities, such as STEM education activities, scientific research, or other activities that support American manufacturing and industry. This account does not fund vehicles or building construction or renovation. The median award in this account for FY22 was $1.25 million, though projects of a modest size are more likely to receive full funding.

NIST, Construction of Research Facilities — Extramural Construction (guidance) –This account funds the construction and renovation of research facilities that will be used in a manner that is aligned with and supportive of NIST’s mission. The median award in this account was $10 million in FY22, though the Committee may consider lower project amounts and give preference to more modest requests.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Operations, Research, and Facilities (guidance) – Requests for funding will be considered for research, demonstration, or education projects performed by external partners or for prioritizing NOAA internal funds for geographically specific projects. Any such project must be aligned with NOAA’s mission and within their existing authorities. 

This account does not fund construction projects. The subcommittee will not entertain requests for funding for the Office of Marine and Aviation Operations or for Coastal Zone Management. Historically, the Committee has not funded vehicles or building construction or renovation under this account.

The median award in this account for FY22 was $750,000, though projects of a modest size are more likely to receive full funding.

Department of Justice, Byrne Justice Assistance Grants (JAG) (guidance) – This program assists state, local, and tribal law enforcement efforts to prevent crime, improve the criminal justice system, provide victims’ services, and other related activities. Projects must comply with the requirements cited in JAG statutes and be consistent with guidance for the program. The Committee encourages community project funding designed to help improve police-community relations. Historically, the Committee has not funded building construction or renovation. The median award in this account for FY22 was $500,000, but projects of a modest size are more likely to receive full funding.

Department of Justice, Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) – Technology and Equipment (guidance) – Funding will be provided for state, local, and tribal law enforcement to develop and acquire effective technologies and interoperable communications that assist in investigating, responding to, and preventing crime, provided that such equipment meets the applicable requirements of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Office of Law Enforcement Standards (OLES). This funding will allow recipients the opportunity to establish and enhance any of a variety of technical equipment and/or programs to encourage the continuation and enhancement of community policing efforts within their jurisdictions. These projects should help improve police effectiveness and the flow of information among law enforcement agencies, local government service providers, and the communities they serve.

Historically, the Committee has not funded vehicles or building construction or renovation in this account. Recipients of community project funding under this account may not subgrant to other organizations or agencies.

The median award in this account for FY22 was $520,000, but projects of a modest size are more likely to receive full funding.

NASA, Safety, Security, and Mission Services (guidance) – Grants will be made for activities consistent with and supportive of the work of NASA’s mission directorates and within the agency’s authorities, such as STEM education activities and scientific research. Funding for building construction or renovation projects will not be considered. The median award in this account for FY22 was $900,000, though projects of a modest size are more likely to receive full funding.

Defense

The Defense Appropriations Subcommittee will accept community funding project requests for the following accounts:

Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Army

Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Navy

Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Air Force

Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Space Force

Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Defense-Wide

Additional guidance is available. Project amounts in these accounts were funded between $200,000 and $4 million in FY22.

Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies

Corps of Engineers, Investigations; Construction; Mississippi River and Tributaries; Operations and Maintenance (guidance) – Only a limited number of authorized Corps of Engineers projects will be accepted. Funding amounts requested should reflect a level that can be realistically utilized in FY23. Examples of projects awarded in FY22 are available.

Bureau of Reclamation, Water and Related Resources (guidance) – Only a limited number of authorized Bureau of Reclamation projects will be accepted. Funding amounts requested should reflect a level that can be realistically utilized in FY23. Examples of projects awarded in FY22 are available.

Department of Energy (DOE) (guidance) – Topics eligible for funding include: energy efficiency; renewable energy; sustainable transportation; cybersecurity; energy security; emergency response; electricity; energy storage; nuclear energy; fossil energy; carbon management; and critical minerals. Statutory cost-share requirements may apply, depending on a number of factors.

Only a limited number of DOE projects are expected to be fulfilled, and funding amounts requested should reflect a level that can be realistically utilized in FY23. Projects in FY22 received between $50,000 to $5.1 million, with an average award of around $740,000.

Financial Services and General Government

General Services Administration, Federal Buildings Fund – New Construction; Major Repairs and Alterations; Basic Repairs (guidance) – Projects are limited to line items in the GSA Federal Buildings Fund requested by the Administration in either the FY22 or FY23 budget request. The awards in FY22 ranged from $500,000 to $50 million.

National Archives and Records Administration, National Historical Publications and Records Commission (guidance) – Grants will be made for projects that help ensure online public discovery and use of historical records collections, encourage public engagement with historical records, strengthen the nation’s archival network, or publish documentary editions of historical records. Generally, projects should comply with the eligibility requirements for existing National Historical Publications and Records Commission grants programs. The average award in FY22 was just under $500,000.

Small Business Administration, Small Business Initiatives (guidance) – Grants will be made to projects in support of small businesses, including but not limited to entrepreneur training, workforce development, counseling, research, and construction or acquisition of facilities. The average award in this account for FY22 was $650,000.

Homeland Security

FEMA, Pre-Disaster Mitigation Projects (guidance) – Only projects that meet the requirements detailed in the most recent Notice of Funding Opportunity for the Building Resilient Infrastructure and Communities (BRIC) grant program will be considered for funding, including the cost-share requirement and environmental and historic preservation requirements. For any projects designated for funding, the state agency responsible for administering mitigation grants must submit an application to FEMA, and that entity will serve as the administrative agent for the grant. Therefore, all project proposals must be accompanied by a letter of support from the appropriate state agency affirming that it believes the project is eligible. Examples of FY22 awards are available.

FEMA, Emergency Operations Center Grant Program (guidance) – Only projects that meet the requirements detailed in the most Notice of Funding Opportunity for the Emergency Operations Center Grant Program, including the cost-share requirement and environmental and historic preservation requirements will be considered for funding. For any projects designated for funding, the respective state administrative agency (SAA) must submit an application to FEMA, and that agency will serve as the administrative agent for the grant. Therefore, all project proposals must be accompanied by a letter of support from the appropriate SSA affirming that it believes the project is eligible. Examples of FY22 awards are available.

Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies

Department of Interior, National Park Service, Save America’s Treasures (SAT) (guidance) – This grant program funds two categories of projects: awards for preservation projects at properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places for national significance or designated a National Historic Landmark; and awards managed by the Institute of Museum and Library Services for projects involving nationally significant collections (including artifacts, museum collections, documents, sculptures, and other works of art).

Each applicant must provide information consistent with program requirements, and all SAT grants require a dollar‐for‐dollar non‐federal matching share. The property must be on the National Register of Historic Places. Grants are not available for work on sites or collections owned by the NPS. If the project has received previous appropriations, it is not eligible. New construction is not eligible nor is the demolition of or significant changes to an historic building. Contractors for the project must be competitively selected. The sponsors of this project must agree to a preservation easement or covenant.

A project funding threshold of up to $500,000 is advised. Examples of successful projects in FY22 are available.

Department of Interior, Land and Water Conservation Fund–Land Acquisition (guidance) – Federal acquisition of lands and water must be for the purpose of land and habitat conservation and the encouragement of outdoor recreation. Third-party organizations frequently participate in the federal acquisition process by coordinating the negotiation and purchase of tracts, but funding goes to one of four agencies that will manage the land: within the Department of the Interior, (1) the Bureau of Land Management, (2) the Fish and Wildlife Service, (3) the National Park Service; and within the Department of Agriculture, (4) the Forest Service. The Committee will look favorably upon requests for projects that appear on the supplemental list of projects that appear in the President’s proposed fiscal year budget request. Examples of successful projects in FY22 are available.

Environmental Protection Agency, State and Tribal Assistance Grants (STAG) (guidance) – These grants fund local wastewater and drinking water infrastructure projects, including construction of and modifications to municipal sewage treatment plants and drinking water treatment plants. STAG infrastructure grants are limited only to projects that are publicly owned or owned by a non-profit entity and that are otherwise eligible for the funding from that state’s Clean Water or Drinking Water State Revolving Funds (SRF) loan programs; privately owned projects are not eligible. The recipient must demonstrate a minimum 20% cost share requirement for any portion of a project funded through a STAG infrastructure grant. 

The Committee will look favorably upon requests for projects that are listed on a state’s most recent Intended Use Plan. In FY22, the majority of EPA STAG infrastructure projects funded in the House bill ranged from $60,000 to $3,500,000.

U.S. Forest Service, State and Private Forestry (guidance) – The State and Private Forestry (S&PF) account provides technical and financial assistance, usually through the network of state foresters, to improve the management, protection, and utilization of the Nation’s forests. Community projects are usually limited and include various specific urban and community forestry projects and specific forest disease or pest treatment areas. State fire assistance projects or specific forestry assistance may also be eligible. Among other program requirements, these projects must meet a one-to-one match.

The Committee will look favorably upon requests for projects that are listed on any federal or state ordinal list or are clearly demonstrated to meet the goals of a State Forest Action Plan(s). In FY22, the majority of State and Private Forestry projects in the House bill ranged from $50,000 to $750,000.

Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies

Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, Training and Employment Services (guidance) – These projects must meet all statutorily mandated requirements for the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act demonstration program. In addition, all projects must: 1) include direct services to individuals to enhance employment opportunities; 2) demonstrate evidence of a linkage with the state or local workforce investment system; and 3) include an evaluation component. Equipment purchases and curriculum development may be included within community project funding only as an incidental part of the entire project. Costs related to the construction or renovation of facilities are not eligible. House project amounts in this account were funded between $100,000 and $2,000,000 in FY22.

HHS, Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) (guidance) – These grants are to help with the cost of construction, renovation, or capital equipment for facilities for provision of health, mental health, or substance abuse services, training of health professionals, or medical research. Examples of eligible facilities include hospitals; health centers and clinics; skilled nursing facilities; mental health centers; facilities for schools of medicine, nursing, or other health professions; and medical research laboratories.

In addition, grants can be used to acquire capital equipment, such as lab equipment, x‐ray machines, and telehealth and information technology equipment. Equipment‐only grants are permissible. Generally, any equipment having a useful life of more than one year and a unit cost of at least $5,000 will be eligible as capital equipment. In addition, equipment with lower costs may also be eligible, provided that it is treated as an item of capital expense under the recipient institution’s preexisting, written accounting policies. One-time equipment expenses for health information systems and electronic medical records systems are permitted expenditures.

The costs of expendable supplies such as pharmaceuticals, lab chemicals, or office paper are not eligible. Grants cannot be used to acquire land or purchase existing buildings, or to pay salaries or other operating or ongoing costs. They cannot be used to pay for work previously completed. Grants can be used for architectural and engineering costs associated with an eligible construction project but not general feasibility studies.

House project in this account were funded between $100,000 and $2,000,000 in FY22.

HHS, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) (guidance) – These grants will resources for substance use and/or mental health services, including prevention, harm reduction, treatment, or recovery support services.

Generally, SAMHSA projects cover: evidence-based substance use disorder and/or mental health treatment services and harm reduction activities; crisis services; suicide prevention activities; recovery support services; screening and assessment; referral and access to treatment services; educational materials; training; treatment of opioid disorders in conjunction with psychosocial services; hiring of behavioral health providers. Additional information on the types of eligible programs and services can be found through SAMHSA.

SAMHSA project funds cannot be used for: inpatient treatment or hospital-based detoxification services; payments to individuals for prevention or treatment services; meals and food; research projects; construction (other than limited renovation costs). More information on allowable or unallowable costs can be found on HHS.

House projects in this account were funded between $100,000 and $2,000,000 in FY22.

HHS, Administration for Children and Families (ACF), Children and Families Services Programs (guidance) – Projects in this account must fall under one of the following categories: 1) Child Abuse Prevention — for projects to improve the prevention, assessment, identification, and treatment of child abuse and neglect through research, model service improvement, information dissemination, and technical assistance. Projects must serve or target children and families who are at risk or who have experienced child abuse and neglect. 2) Social Services Research and Demonstration — for projects to promote the ability of families to thrive through financial self-sufficiency in order to prevent and reduce poverty and to promote the healthy development and greater well-being of children and families. Projects can serve a diverse population, including low-income individuals, children, youth, families, individuals with developmental disabilities, and Native Americans. Funding cannot be used for construction or renovation of facilities. 

The Committee expects to consider projects between $100,000 and $2,000,000. Examples of successful projects from FY22 are available.

HHS, Administration for Community Living (ACL), Aging and Disability Services Programs (guidance) – Funding in this account may be used for projects to improve or create new opportunities for older adults, individuals of all ages with disabilities, and their eligible family caregivers, to live independently and participate fully in their communities. Generally, community project funding should focus on improving access to, or the quality of, education, health services, training, support services, and independent living services for older adults, individuals with disabilities, and eligible family caregivers. Project funding cannot be used for construction or renovation of facilities.

The Committee expects to consider projects between $100,000 and $2,000,000. Examples of successful projects from FY22 are available.

Department of Education, Elementary and Secondary Education–Innovation and Improvement (guidance) – These projects include instructional services, afterschool centers, curricula development, teacher training, acquisition of books and computers, arts education, social and emotional learning activities, full-service community schools, and early childhood education. In general, the focus of elementary and secondary education community project funding should be providing early childhood or K‐12 educational services. Projects to provide and improve special education services at the elementary and secondary levels are also eligible. Projects may include early intervention services for infants and toddlers, transition services, and postsecondary education services.

Eligible grantees are state education agencies, school districts, colleges and universities, and other public and private nonprofit entities. Generally, community project funding intended for individual schools is provided to the applicable school district and not directly to the individual school.

Community project funding cannot be used for construction or renovation of school buildings, except in the case of minor remodeling required as part of technology upgrades. Daycare and childcare projects that do not include educational services are also not eligible.

House projects in this account were funded between $100,000 and $2,000,000 in FY22.

Department of Education, Postsecondary Education–Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) (guidance) – Project funding in this account can be designated for a wide variety of higher education projects. Generally, projects should focus on improving access to, or the quality of, postsecondary education. Construction or renovation of academic buildings are not eligible, except in the case of minor remodeling required as part of technology upgrades. Grantees are usually colleges and universities but may include other public and private nonprofit organizations.

Examples of the types of projects that can be funded under FIPSE include projects to hire and train faculty, establish and improve degree programs, improve teacher preparation programs, develop and improve curricula, upgrade technology and telecommunications, acquire science laboratory equipment, provide student support, implement university partnerships with school districts, and establish research and training centers. Any project that appears to target services toward a particular race, ethnicity, or gender must have a description that makes clear that it will be operated in a race/ethnicity-neutral and gender-neutral manner.

House projects in this account were funded between $100,000 and $2,000,000 in FY22.

Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies

Department of Defense, Military Construction (guidance) – Eligible requests include both construction and unspecified minor military construction projects for active components (Army, Navy and Marine Corps, Air Force, Space Force, Defense-wide agencies), including construction, installation, equipment of temporary or permanent public works, military installations, and facilities. Request may also be made for unspecified minor military construction projects for Reserve Components (Army National Guard, Air National Guard, Army Reserve, Navy Reserve, Air Force Reserve), including construction, expansion, rehabilitation, and conversion of facilities for training and administration.

An unspecified minor military construction project is a project that has an approved cost equal to or less than $6,000,000. Requested projects must be shovel ready in FY23 with 35% design complete and must be positioned to have contracts awarded in FY23. Some Reserve Component projects require a state funding match.

Planning and design funding can be requested for specific projects when they are not yet at 35% design and therefore ineligible for construction funding. The types of projects under this heading include improving facility resilience, study, planning, design, and architect and engineer services.

Requests must appear on a list of projects provided to Congress by the Secretary of Defense or his/her designee (Future Year Defense Program, Unfunded Requirements / Unfunded Priorities Lists, Cost-to-completes). Projects that only appear on a project list provided by a base commander will not be accepted. If a project has not been previously authorized, requests must also be submitted to the House Armed Services Committee (HASC) for inclusion in the FY23 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Previous authorizations expire after three fiscal years. All projects must have a corresponding DD Form 1391.

The average award for Military Construction projects in FY22 was $18 million.

Department of Veterans Affairs, Construction–Minor Projects (guidance) – Requests are eligible only for VA Minor Construction projects, which include capital projects with costs equal to or less than $20,000,000, particularly projects that construct new space instead of renovating existing space. Examples may include expanding existing facility square footage to provide additional healthcare capacity, construction of specialty care buildings or clinics, building of parking structures, or expanding gravesite space at cemeteries.

Only projects that appear on VA’s Integrated Departmentwide Priority List for 2023 Construction Projects (2023 Construction SCIP List) included in the President’s budget request will be considered. Veterans memorials, parks, museums, and other similar projects are not eligible nor are direct grants to veterans organizations or for local programmatic efforts.

Project funding will be capped at 10% of the project’s total estimated cost of the to support planning and design that can be executed within twelve months of receiving funding. Similar projects on the FY22 list would generally have been in the range of $1,000,000 to $2,000,000. Exceptions to the 10% cap may be made for projects where construction is ready to be supported in year one, and only applies to some National Cemetery Administration (NCA) Minor Construction projects.

Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies

General guidance for this Subcommittee is available for reference.

Department of Transportation, Airport Improvement Program (AIP) (guidance) – Grants may be used to enhance airport safety, capacity, and security and mitigate environmental concerns. All projects must be: AIP eligible in accordance with sections 49 U.S.C. 47101 to 47175 and FAA policy and guidance; supported broadly by local stakeholders, including residents, businesses, and elected officials; administered by an airport and/or airport sponsor. The average award in this account for FY22 was $4 million, and the Committee may consider project amounts of up to $7 million.

Department of Transportation, Highway Infrastructure Projects (guidance) – Highway Infrastructure Projects are capital projects eligible under title 23 of the United States Code. Eligible projects are described under 23 U.S.C. 133(b), as amended by title III of division A of the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act. Tribal and territorial capital projects authorized under Chapter 2 of title 23, United States Code, are also eligible.

Projects must be administered by public entities or tribal entities and be capital projects or project-specific planning/design for a capital project. Projects must also be supported by the state or tribal government that would administer the project. Inclusion on a Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) or Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) would satisfy this requirement.

Activities that are administrative in nature are not eligible even if they are eligible expenses under the statutory citation. These include general operating expenses and activities required under sections 134 and 135 of title 23, United States Code.

The average award in this account was $2.7 million in FY22, and the Committee may consider project amounts of up to $7 million.

Department of Transportation, Transit Infrastructure Projects (guidance) – Transit Infrastructure Projects are public transportation capital projects eligible under chapter 53 of title 49 of the United States Code. Eligible capital projects are described under Section 5302(4) of title 49, United States Code, and Section 5339(b)(1) and (c)(1)(B) of title 49.

All projects must be administered by public entities or tribal entities and be transit capital projects or project-specific planning/design for a transit capital project. The projects must be supported by the state, local governmental authority, or tribal government that would administer the project. Inclusion on a Statewide Transportation Improvement Plan (STIP) or Transportation Improvement Plan (TIP) would satisfy this requirement.

Public transportation or transit is defined in Section 5302(15) and (22) of title 49, United States Code, as regular, continuing shared-ride surface transportation that is open to the general public or open to a segment of the general public defined by age, disability, or low income, and does not include intercity passenger rail transportation, intercity bus service, charter bus service, school bus service, sightseeing service, courtesy shuttle service for patrons of one or more specific establishments, or intra-terminal or intra-facility shuttle services.

Activities that are administrative in nature are not eligible even if they are eligible expenses under the statutory citation. These include general operating expenses, and activities authorized under sections 5303, 5304, and 5305 of title 49, United States Code. Capital Investment Grant (CIG) projects will not be funded.

The average award in this account was $2.5 million in FY22, but the Committee may consider project amounts of up to $7 million.

HUD, Economic Development Initiative (EDI) (guidance) – EDI community project funding may be used for economic and community development activities, including land or site acquisition, demolition or rehabilitation of housing or facilities, construction and capital improvements of public facilities (including water and sewer facilities), and public services. Requests may also include planning and other activities consistent with previously funded activities eligible under the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program, unless otherwise specified. Capital and operating expenses for fire and police stations are not eligible.

All projects must be administered by governmental or non-profit entities, including public housing agencies, as well as tribes and tribally designated housing entities. The projects must also be supported broadly by local stakeholders, including residents, businesses, and elected officials.

The average award in this account for FY22 was $1.5 million, and the Committee may consider project amounts of up to $4 million.